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Oh, bother: a lesson in ‘Christopher Robin’ 

Miriam Orr

“Let’s Begin by taking a smallish nap or two.” – Winnie the Pooh.

That’s about where I am as I sit and write this, if I am honest. But, that’s beside the point. 

Now, you may be confused as to why a 20-something reporter is quoting Winnie the Pooh. You also may or may not have heard that our favorite “bear with very little brain” has waddled onto the big screen across the nation. 

Before you get confused and consult last week’s paper, let me just refresh your memory. Yes, I did review “Mission Impossible: Fallout” in the paper last week – but, I saw the Winnie the Pooh movie roughly around the same time, and it was far too adorable for me to wait another week to talk about it.

The short end of it is this – if you want a cute movie that will make your kids laugh while making you cry, this year’s “Christopher Robin” is your “small smackerel.”

An oldie but a goodie, this film, as you probably guessed, follows the adult life of Christopher Robin after he says what will be his final goodbye to his Hundred Acre Wood friends, Pooh, Piglet, Owl, Rabbit, Eeyore, Kanga, and Roo. This film follows up where the 1977 original “The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh” leaves off – at a hero party, with cake and other goodies, that celebrates Pooh and his friends’ heroic efforts.

You can probably guess what happens – when Christopher Robin is called out of the woods, his presence is to be greatly missed. He wouldn’t return as promised, until he was a much older man, with the burdens of adulthood, and responsibilities far greater than that of Eeyore’s consistently-AWOL tail. 

I found myself sobbing into a Kleenex within the first five minutes of the movie – it wouldn’t be the last time I cried, however, because the film is a tear-jerker. But, at the same time, it catches you reliving the hilarious goofiness of your childhood favorites, who are, of course, up to their same antics as they navigate their little woods in their simple, little lives.

What’s amazing about this movie is that while profound for adults, the message is very clear for children, still. This iterates just how involved you are in the things that don’t really matter, and how much of your life is passing you by. Christopher Robin learns the hard way that we only get to live once, and we have to make the present moments count, because there are, indeed, just moments of the present.

Pooh helps a downtrodden, depressed, and overloaded Christopher Robin “let go” of the worries of today and be a child again, when he needs it most – not without making a mess along the way, however! From sticky honey in the kitchen to wandering off with a balloon, Pooh has just as much to learn from our world as Christopher has from the Hundred Acre Wood.

This film is hugely important in our world today, when the world demands so much and families are strained. Christopher Robin stands in the face of losing the love of his family in light of having to keep a dead-end job, and I can’t help but thank that many parents are in the same position with their families. Unity and togetherness are compromised in a world that demands our full attention with work, technology, strain, financial obligation, and violence. Christopher Robin can’t remember the time he last enjoyed a dinner with his family, and there are many today who haven’t supped together in any sense of the word.

I am reminded of Matthew 6:34, which reads, “Do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.”

How true it is! If that isn’t just like a Pooh-ism, I don’t know what is. Pooh continually reminds Christopher of what is important in the now, and to stop worrying about things he can’t control – things like Heffalumps and Woozles, of which Christopher finds himself in good company with more often than once during his grand adventure. 

I say we take a break from worrying about things we cannot change in the future and start focusing on the things we can handle right in front of us. Whether its buying a home, trying to juggle medical bills, worrying about school or the political arena, I think it’s high time we sat down with a pot of “hunny” to enjoy the simple things in life, if only for a little while before adulthood comes around again. If God thought it was important enough to write down in his holy Word, I think it’s a lesson worth considering.

Oh, bother.

 


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